How About Today, eh?

Highlights from the various teams from Thursday:

Leadership: Early this morning, Palmer and the Leadership Team went to a town called Karnpleh to encourage and minister to over 50 pastors and church leaders from the surrounding villages. It was a great time of ministering to the saints and helping to equip them to stay strong and stay focused.

Dirt Bike Squad: Leaving early this morning, the DBS made it to 3 different villages today with deliveries of shoes. They came back with incredible stories of being welcomed like dignitaries. The local people would sing and dance for them, and present them with gifts of food. The DBS guide (a student from ABC) would go in to the villages and go home by home to gather everyone, and tell them what we were doing. There is also rumor of a couple spills on the bikes (one even caught on camera, but that hasn’t been released to the public yet), but everyone is just fine. This new, crazy hair-brained idea for a ministry is turning out to be pretty incredible!

Medical Team: Setting up the clinic at the nearby orphanage, the medical team had a crazy busy first day. “On average, I see about 25 people a day at my office,” says Dr Grace Haynes, “today, we saw almost 400.” I guess the prospect of free (and good) medical help is music to many ears out here. So many, in fact, that the orphans themselves never actually got to see the doctors! But fear not, they will make a special trip back just for them. The team came back with incredible reports of the things they saw and the ways they were able to help people.

Da Band: So it turns out the way WE think about, learn, and arrange music in America is significantly different from the way LIBERIANS think about, learn, and arrange music (thank you, Captain Obvious). But simply “knowing” this is one thing, actually experiencing is quite another. Today we tried to work with some of the ABC students to learn some of their praise and worship songs to add to our concert set-list. Now, the songs themselves weren’t overly difficult… if they would have just a chord charts or some sort of music it would have been relatively simple. But, that’s not how they do it… So we spent a good 2 hours of misunderstanding and confusion, strange looks and bad notes as they tried to explain to us how it went while were trying to explain to them why we didn’t understand what they were doing… hah! But we eventually got it figured out, and I’m excited to open our concert tomorrow night with some Liberian Praise and Worship.

Basketball: The repair and touch-ups of the court were finished this morning. After lunch, they walked around the city and invited kids aged 9-16 to come to an impromptu Basketball Clinic. About 50 kids showed up at first, but that soon turned to 200! (with many little ones aged 2-4! Thank Joel Pritchard for helping them learn to “skip”, run, and eventually even “walk” all around the court!). Then, after the clinic, they ended up scrimmaging some of the guys from the team we’ll be playing tomorrow, which eventually drew a crowd of close to 500 people! The guys claim that the crowd was cheering primarily, if not “only,” for us! How funny is that…

We all had a great dinner together and debriefed a bit about our days. It is pretty incredible to see the kind of response each of our teams have been getting from the LIberian people. They seem genuinely happy that we are here, and overwhelmed with gratitude with our presence and love with no condition.

Thank you for praying.

– Posted using BlogPress from the other side of the world

Location:Liberia West Africa

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